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Adventures of an American cooking, eating and living in France

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This Roasted Tomato Soup with Bacon is oh so yummy

This Roasted Tomato Soup with Bacon is oh so yummy

It’s officially tomato season and I’m back with another soup! This time it’s a warm roasted tomato soup with bacon. MMMMM…. We’re picking loads of tomatoes from our garden, and last weekend I harvested ten gorgeous ones (to add to the two I still had […]

This roasted ratatouille will knock your socks off!

This roasted ratatouille will knock your socks off!

It’s summertime, which in France (and elsewhere) means that the awesome summer veggies are arriving just in time to make a delicious ratatouille! I’m talking scrumptious eggplant, zesty zucchini, and pungent peppers. They are bountiful, and it’s no wonder that ratatouille is considered one of […]

Chilled cucumber soup hits the spot on a hot summer day

Chilled cucumber soup hits the spot on a hot summer day

We’ve got a heat wave going on here in western France right now, and we’ve been looking for easy ways to cool off, including eating half a gallon of ice cream and/or sorbet in a single sitting. Because of the heat, I’ve been on a […]

Cool down with Chilled Carrot Soup

Cool down with Chilled Carrot Soup

It’s nearly summer, and the weather has definitely started to get warm in France (though, to be fair Western France’s weather is highly erratic; one day it’s 80 F, the next it’s 65 F.) Due to a recent mix-up in my shopping list, I had […]

Easy & Delicious Glazed Duck Breasts

Easy & Delicious Glazed Duck Breasts

One of the meats that is readily and inexpensively available in France is duck breast. Where in the U.S. I may have bought a single duck breast for about $10 – $15, here in France I can usually get two for that same price, and […]

Les Flots: A meal worth every cent

Les Flots: A meal worth every cent

My wife and I recently celebrated our 14th anniversary (hard to believe it’s been that long), and we decided to get away for a weekend to La Rochelle. And, like any good couple, we decided to treat ourselves to a nicer restaurant than we might […]


You have to try this!

The Joys of Outdoor Cooking

The Joys of Outdoor Cooking

When I lived in the States, I had a nice gas grill. In the late spring, summer and fall, we'd cook and eat outside more often than not, but when we moved to France we moved to an apartment. That meant no grill. I suppose I could buy one and just put it in the parking lot when I want to use it, but that seems like 1) a pain in the ass and 2) not really the same experience. We also have some neighbors who are a little picky about what people do and don't do in the building, and it's just easier not to bother them.

So when we went to visit a friend's beach house last weekend, I was thrilled that we'd be cooking our lunch on a large, chimney grill. I've never used one before, and this was an excellent opportunity to get my grill on. And luckily, our friends brought three nice size pieces of meat: one rib-eye (entrecote) and two thick NY strip steaks (faux filet).

Outdoor grill

Our friend built the fire, and he threw in a couple of things that caught my eye. First, he threw in some fresh pine branches. Pine is very common in the region, but I had never thought to use it in a wood grill. The second was a few branches of fresh laurel, i.e. bay leaves. I had always believed that you can't eat bay leaves, and it's best to just let them steep in soup or sauce. So I was surprised when we burned them. However, it turns out that it's not true that bay leaves are toxic. Besides, we didn't directly ingest them, only added a few branches to the fire.

Grilling with pine

And what a difference these two woods made (don't ask me what the other wood was--it was set up before we got there by someone else in our friends' family). The meat turned out smoky, rich and just heavenly. I'm typically not a fan of NY strip, as I find it a little less flavorful and tougher than rib eye. Unfortunately, because the rib eye was far thinner than the NY strips, it cooked faster and served first. With a hungry crowd and my duties tending to the grill, I didn't get a chance to taste it!

Le bon boeuf #outdoorcooking #eatfrench #eatfrenchclub

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Grilled NY Strip

Grilled NY strip

Earlier in the day, I had made a quick carrot and beet salad, which worked well to brighten up the meat with the vibrant acidity of lemon and herbiness of dill and rosemary used in the dressing.

I don't really have a recipe for the grilled meat, though, as the majority of the flavor for this meal comes from the method of cooking more than anything. But, if you want a delicious steak, the method is simple:

  1. Generously salt & pepper the steak on both sides.
  2. Slather with olive oil.
  3. Grill for approximately 5 minutes on each side (7-8 if your steak is thicker).
  4. Let it rest for approximately 5 minutes, that is if you can manage to keep your hands off it--good luck with that!

I do, however, have a recipe for my carrot and beet salad. It's quite simple and refreshing. Perfect for when the weather's warm and you don't want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen.

 

Carrot and Beet Salad

Ingredients
  • Two medium-sized carrots
  • Two medium-sized fresh beets (not ones that have already been cooked)
  • Zest of one lemon
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 3-4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • About 2 tablespoons fresh dill, finely chopped
Method
  1. Peel and dice carrots and beets.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly.

As always, if you try this recipe or have a cool outdoor grilling picture, tag #eatfrenchclub on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. 

Eat up!